Alessandro Iannaccone, MD, MS

dr-iannacconeAlessandro Iannaccone, MD, MS, FARVO is Professor of Ophthalmology at the Duke University Department of Ophthalmology, in Durham, NC, where he serves as the Director of the newly established Center for Retinal Degenerations and Ophthalmic Genetic Diseases. Prior to joining Duke University on September 2016, Dr. Iannaccone was an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Hamilton Eye Institute in Memphis, TN, where he served as the founding Director of the Retinal Degenerations & Ophthalmic Genetics Service and the Lions’ Visual Function Diagnostic Lab since 1997.

He received his medical degree from the University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy, where he also did his residency in Ophthalmology, followed by fellowships on retinal degenerations with Dr. Jacobson at the Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania and on pediatric retinal and optic nerve diseases at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, where he subsequently also obtained a Masters in Biostatistics and Epidemiology.

His research has received uninterrupted funding since 1998 through numerous grants, contracts, and awards, including a K23 Award, an R21 and, presently, an R01 from the National Eye Institute, and a Career Development Award from Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB), followed in 2012 by the RPB’s Physician Scientist Award. In 2009 he also received the ARVO/Alcon Clinician-Scientist Research Award. He has participated in the CNTF trials for RP and is presently a Site PI for the FFB-sponsored VPA trial for RP. Dr. Iannaccone is also the Co-Founder of the FFB Mid-South Chapter of Memphis, for which he has been President of since Jan. 2012, and participates actively in free educational activities for Chapter members and fundraising activities for FFB via the Memphis VisionWalk.

Dr. Iannaccone specializes in hereditary and degenerative diseases of the retina and macula, including age-related macular degeneration, autoimmune retinopathies and optic neuropathies, ophthalmic genetics, retinal imaging, and visual function testing via electrophysiological and psychophysical methods.  He has been an invited lecturer on 50 occasions, and he has written, presented, and published extensively in these areas, with over 70 peer-reviewed manuscripts, over 30 other publications, and nearly 150 meeting presentations.